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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What does TCP stand for?
What is TCP?
Where is the TCP located?
When was the building construction finished?
Where did the funds come from to build the TCP?
Who is providing ongoing funding for the TCP?
How big is the building?
What is TCP Research & Facility Operations responsible for? What services does it provide?
What is TCP Transgenic Core & Specialty Resources? What services does it provide?
What is the CMHD? What research and services does it provide?
What is the CMMR? What research and services does it provide?
What is MICe? What research and services does it provide?

CMHD ENU Mutagenesis & Physiology FAQs

CMHD Neurobehaviour FAQs

CMHD Gene Trap FAQs

CMMR Cryo FAQs

CMMR-NorCOMM FAQs



What does TCP stand for?

Toronto Centre for Phenogenomics


What is TCP?

The Toronto Centre for Phenogenomics is a $69 million, state-of-the-art facility that enables groundbreaking research and discovery with the goal of advancing human health. Through the modeling of disease, the TCP seeks cures and treatments in areas such as diabetes, cancer, musculoskeletal disease, neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular and renal disease, and stem cell and regenerative medicine. The TCP is a unique collaboration among research-intensive Member Hospitals: Mount Sinai Hospital and The Hospital for Sick Children.


Where is the TCP located?

TCP is located at 25 Orde Street, in the heart of Toronto’s Discovery District, (close to University Avenue and College Street).


When was the building construction finished?

Construction was completed in July 2007


Where did the funds come from to build the TCP?

The $69 million enterprise was funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the Ontario Innovation Trust (OIT), Member Hospital contributions and in-kind funding from industry.


Who is providing ongoing funding for the TCP?

Although there are some start-up funds from CFI and the Member-Hospitals, the TCP will be completely self-funded by the research activity it supports.


How big is the building?

The TCP is the largest vivarium in Canada with 110,000 gross sq ft of custom-designed laboratory space on floors: two below ground and two above.


What is TCP Research & Facility Operations responsible for? What services does it provide?

As a support program at TCP, Research & Facility Operations provides professional veterinary services, and coordination of research services that are driven by the research programs at TCP and by TCP Transgenic Core & Specialty Resources. The TCP provides an optimal high-security specific-pathogens free (SPF) animal facility for holding research mice and offers related research services including procurement, husbandry, veterinary consultation, and diagnostic and health monitoring services. TCP Research & Facility Operations provides services including custom breeding of genetically engineered mice, technical expertise including drug administration, sample collection, device implantation, pre-clinical in vivo GLP toxicology/drug trials, and research technique training.


What is TCP Transgenic Core & Specialty Resources? What services does it provide?

The Transgenic Core & Specialty Resources offer the production of transgenic mice by pronuclear microinjection and generation of chimeric mice using embryonic stem (ES) cells by morula aggregation and blastocyst microinjection methods as well as tetraploid complementation assay. Additional services offered include gene targeting using tested ES cell lines and reagents from the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute (SLRI) Mount Sinai Hospital ES cell facility, expansion of ES cell clones from outside facilities, preparation of ES cells for experiments, re-derivation of mouse strains into specific pathogen-free status and production of timed pregnant mice.


What is the CMHD? What research and services does it provide?

The Centre for Modeling Human Disease (CMHD) is a multi-centre, integrative initiative that provides core facilities for the generation and analysis of mutant mice to the local and national community. The CMHD also participates in international initiatives in large-scale, genome-wide mutagenesis of the mouse genome. Under the direction of Dr. Janet Rossant, a world leader in mouse developmental genetics, the CMHD has utilized and developed a number of mutagenic techniques in combination with various phenotyping tools that address areas such as diabetes, hematology, bone mineralization, cardiovascular and renal function, learning, memory and behaviour, and embryonic development. Currently a variety of services are available through the CMHD laboratory facilities including the Phenotyping Core, the Pathology Core, the Mouse Genetic Mapping Core and the Gene Trap Core.


What is the CMMR? What research and services does it provide?

The Canadian Mouse Mutant Repository (CMMR) is a CIHR, Genome Canada and industry-sponsored (Charles River Canada) program that stores and distributes Canada’s mutant mouse resource. The CMMR has established a central repository for the physical archive of cryopreserved mouse ES cells, germplasm (sperm and ovaries), embryos, tissues and DNA generated by Canada’s thriving mouse genome effort. CMMR is a founding member of the Federation of International Mouse Resources (FIMRe) that coordinates distribution of mutants and samples between repositories in Canada, United States, Europe, and the Pacific Rim.


What is MICe? What research and services does it provide?

The Mouse Imaging Centre (MICe) is a research program of The Hospital for Sick Children that is located at the TCP. MICe is a unique resource combining the latest state-of-the-art optical and digital imaging technologies for the characterization of mouse functional genomics. Our state-of-the-art imaging equipment studies the mouse at all stages of life. Most of the studies can be performed in vivo, allowing for time-course studies in individual mice.

 

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